Sunday, 20 Jun 2021

‘Nasty psycho’ Ian Brady faked hunger strike and got star treatment, says ex-lag

Moors murderer Ian Brady was treated like a celebrity behind bars, according to a fellow inmate.

The monster, who killed five children, is said to have been given special perks during his time at Ashworth Hospital.

Reformed criminal Ben Hatchett spent three years alongside him at the high security unit and says he was sickened by what he saw.

He told the Daily Star Sunday: “Brady was given special treatment. The staff looked after him. At night everyone had to go back to their cells at 9pm. They were all locked up at night — except him.

“Brady was the only person who didn’t have to do that. His door never got locked. He was able to go out into different areas whenever he wanted. Thankfully I was on a different ward to him.”

Brady is also said to have secretly enjoyed treats including biscuits.

For years he insisted he was on hunger strike in a bid to be moved to a regular prison.

But Ben claims the protest was a sham.

He said: “Brady wasn’t on hunger strike at all. He made out he was, but he wasn’t. The staff would give him biscuits and jam sandwiches.

“Because his cell was never locked up, he could go out at night and get hot drinks with his flask as well.”

Brady’s perks annoyed others serving time at Ashworth Hospital.

Ben said: “There was anger about what went on. A lot of the lads weren’t happy about it.

“He was a piece of s***. He was just a nasty psychopath. So why was he given special treatment?

“I think the staff treated him differently because he was so high profile. There was always a danger of him being attacked.

“He used to walk around his ward with a pen. He was very confrontational. I think he did it for safety in case someone went for him.”

Brady was jailed in 1966 along with Myra Hindley for murdering Lesley Ann Downey, 10, John Kilbride, 12, and Edward Evans, 17.

They later admitted murdering Pauline Reade and Keith Bennett.

Brady was held at Ashworth Hospital for 32 years before his death in 2017.

A Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust spokesman said: “We are unable to comment on individual patients because of rules governing patient confidentiality.”

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