Saturday, 25 Jan 2020

BBC staff are warned to HIDE their work ID cards on the way to work

BBC staff are warned to HIDE their work ID cards on the way to work to avoid being confronted by angry members of the public amid complaints of political bias from both sides

  • The broadcaster has been running a Wear It In, Don’t Wear It Out campaign
  • The corporation has been been at the centre of a political bias row recently
  • Staff get reminders of need to adhere to the advice with human resources clips 

BBC staff have been told to hide their work ID cards in public to avoid being confronted by angry members of the public. 

The corporation has been at the centre of a political bias row during recent Brexit debates. 

The broadcaster has been running a Wear It In, Don’t Wear It Out campaign, reminding their staff to keep their ID cards covered up outside. 

BBC staff have been told to hide their work ID cards in public to avoid being confronted by angry members of the public 

Earlier this week the BBC News at Ten presenter Huw Edwards was accused of bias after liking tweets supporting Labour policies and mocking the Conservatives. 

However it has been the lower-profile members of staff who have experienced the worst of the complaints while wearing ID lanyards around their necks out in public. 

Staff at the Broadcasting House in London and at Media City in Salford get regular reminders of the need to adhere to the advice with human resources clips that play out on screens around BBC buildings.

In one video they have been warned some staff have been subject to derogatory remarks from angry viewers. 

Earlier this week the BBC News at Ten presenter Huw Edwards (pictured) was accused of bias after liking tweets supporting Labour policies and mocking the Conservatives

One staff member added that there are also worries that passes might be stolen and used to gain access to the buildings.

The staff member told The Express: ‘The high-profile stars accused of bias get a lot of abuse for it online – particularly social media – with the likes of Gary Lineker and last week Huw Edwards but it’s the rank and file that are targets in person.

‘It’s also a worry that someone with a grudge or wanting to make a bigger point could snatch a pass and try and gain access to one of the buildings.

‘Who knows what they would do and what threat they could pose.’

A BBC spokesperson said: ‘This is standard advice provided to staff at most large public organisations and hasn’t changed for years.’ 

It comes days after BBC News boss Fran Unsworth said they were a ‘lightning rod for political discontent’. 

Source: Read Full Article

Related Posts